Queensway Fields benefit from MMBEN funding

 

The MMBEN Steering Group were looking for a project to support with some of the money raised by the Network, and from several proposals decided that this one best embodied the reasons why the Network was set up in the first place.

Chair of MMBEN Adrian Platt said, “it was always our vision for the Network to contribute directly to conservation, and we are therefore very proud that our first direct contribution is to sponsor a project in the heart of the Meres & Mosses that will both benefit wildlife in Whitchurch and provide opportunities for families to get closer to nature.  MMBEN Supporters should be very proud that their actions are making such a difference to the landscape”

MMBEN brings together businesses from across Shropshire, Cheshire and Staffordshire to enhance their environmental performance and profitability by sharing knowledge and understanding. The network also supports local projects and communities. Queensway Playing Fields are an important community outdoor area, covering two acres of parkland and woodland and featuring a playground, football pitch, woodland and a fishing lake. Queensway Playing Fields Association plan to use the donation to make improvements to the park and to ensure the park’s long term future as a key part of the Whitchurch Community.

 

For more information about the Meres and Mosses Business Environment Network, please visit www.meresandmossesben.co.uk


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The Meres and Mosses area is the second largest natural network of ponds and wetlands in England (the Lake District is the largest)


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