Lapwings are familiar birds of farmlands and wetlands, and can often be seen flying across winter skies in large, black and white flocks. As spring approaches, the flocks get smaller, with some birds heading back to their continental breeding grounds and others dispersing to breed in the UK. Males put on dramatic aerial displays, tumbling through the air, accompanied by their piercing 'peewit' call, which gives them their other, common name. Females can be spotted on nests which are simple scrapes in the mud or sand and, by late spring, cute, fluffy lapwing chicks can be seen venturing out to forage. If the nest is threatened at all, lapwings will 'mob' predators - attacking them in an effort to distract them from the eggs and chicks.

Lapwings are easily recognised by its long crest, black and white pattern and the very broad, bluntly rounded shape of its wings. From a distance lapwings look black and white but, up-close, the back has an iridescent green and purple sheen.

Lapwing.  RSPB Images

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The Meres and Mosses landscape was formed by retreating glaciers 12,000 years ago. Now, lowland raised peat bogs are one of the most endangered habitats on Earth.

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